Tuesday, February 21, 2017

THE KINDERGARTEN ARTIST WHO PAINTED A BLUE POLAR BEAR

Congratulations to our Kindergarten artists! Our latest audiobook was published by iTunes to the iBookstore. "The Kindergarten Artist Who Painted a Blue Polar Bear" is available for you to download into your iBooks app on your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch or Mac computer. Each page features a painting based on the style of Eric Carle's illustration, along with a short story written and read aloud by our student artists.

Here is how the book is listed in iTunes...
Enjoy the creativity of our young artists at Ranney School!!


Description

This audiobook was created by the Kindergarten artists at Ranney School, Tinton Falls, NJ. The illustrations were inspired by the book, “The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse,” by Eric Carle. The stories and audio are all presented by the student artists.

The Kindergarten Artist Who Painted a Blue Polar Bear
View in iTunes
  • Free
  • Available on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Mac.
  • Category: Education
  • Published: Mar 01, 2017
  • Publisher: Ranney School
  • Seller: Barbara Levine
  • Print Length: 33 Pages
  • Language: English
  • Requirements: This book was designed for an iOS device and some features may not work as intended with a mouse or trackpad. To view this book, you must have an iOS device with iBooks 3 or later and iOS 5.0 or later.

BEGINNERS . . . Penguins in the snow!

Penguin by Arjun

It might be a mild winter in New Jersey, but our penguins are enjoying a snowy day. Beginners practiced many art skills with this project. They used scissors to cut out their black penguin bodies and penguin feet. The snow in the background was made with their fingerprints and white paint. The furry penguin fur was made by gluing down soft, white cotton balls. To top it all off, they practiced writing their names in the sky!

Here are a few more adorable penguins to enjoy. Follow this link to our home page of artsonia to see all of our Beginner projects.   http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=114839



Penguin by David

Penguin by Emerson

Penguin by GiGi
Note to families...
This art blog will be updated regularly with new posts sharing our daily activities in the art room and news about upcoming art exhibits. To respect the privacy of our students, names will always be limited to first name only and identifiable photos will never be accompanied with a name. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to write in the comment box below or send me an email at blevine@ranneyschool.org. I would love to hear from you!
    In my class, students are given the chance to explore different materials and fun new techniques as they develop their signature style. Some young artists love to draw with a pencil, some like to paint on canvas or create images in a digital format, while others prefer working with clay and molding three-dimensional forms. In my classroom, we use a variety of materials allowing all artists to experiment and figure out which type of art they like the best. At Ranney School, we place a strong emphasis on originality and celebrate artistic differences, always nurturing and encouraging the imagination of every student.
     Remember to check out our display of finished artwork and student portfolios in the Ranney home page of Artsonia.com.  http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=114839


Wednesday, February 8, 2017

PRE-KINDERGARTEN . . . Sharing a sparkling sticker!

Rainbow Fish by Marlena

Pre-Kindergarten students just completed an underwater scene with watercolor paints and markers, based on the illustrations in the book, "The Rainbow Fish," by Marcus Pfister. In this story, we read about a beautiful fish who learned the way to true happiness only after sharing his special scales with the other fish in the sea. What activities do you do at home that is more fun when you share them with your friends? Doesn't it feel good when you make someone you care about feel special too?

Here is a video of the story we read together in class to share with your family...



To create our paintings, we first learned how to draw a fish using basic shapes, such as a circle and a triangle. We also learned how to add scales inside the fish and how to complete a full underwater scene with an ocean bottom, plants, starfish, crabs and bubbles in the water.

Next, we created the ocean with a large brush, lots of water and blue watercolor paint. With markers, we colored each detail in the scene. Finally, when all the scenes were complete, we shared a sparkling sticker with every fish and friend in class!

Here are some examples of our underwater scenes. To see all of our work, click on this link for artsonia. com and scroll down to the Pre-K exhibit.  http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=114839

Rainbow Fish by Odin

Rainbow Fish by Kaitlyn

Rainbow Fish by Sal

Rainbow Fish by Sharnagat

Rainbow Fish by David

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

FIFTH GRADE . . . Look carefully!

Illusion by Alexandra P.


Maurits Cornelis Escher, best known to us as M.C. Escher, was a Dutch graphic artist. His woodcut, called "Sky and Water," from 1938, is typical of Escher's work. It plays around with the positive and negative spaces in the print, tricking us to focus on just the birds in the sky and not realizing that the white spaces between the birds actually create the fish in the water. In mathematical terms, his artwork is often called a tessellation, a repetition of tiles that fit together like a puzzle.

Fifth graders worked on original illusions with one image that tessellates together with another image in a creative way. This project was difficult for us to do and definitely called on our creative thinking skills. It is hard enough to solve a problem, even harder to come up with our own puzzle for everyone else to solve! The main idea behind our puzzles is to be able to see an image two different ways. With Alex's clever illusion above, she successfully makes us see both a horse and a letter "A".

Here are a few more examples of our illusions. To see all of our work, check out our exhibit page on Artsonia.com.  http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=114839

Illusion by Leo
The face of the cat is actually a mouse. The ears of the mouse form the eyes of the cat, really making you take a second look!

Illusion by Gabrielle M.
The blending of color for Gabby's unicorn's hair is absolutely beautiful. It is reminiscent of the illuminated manuscripts of the Medieval times. In manuscripts such as, "The Book of Kells," letters of the alphabet were often decorated in this way and the shapes symbolic of an animal.

Illusion by Parson
Well known for his intricate line drawings, Parson created a side view of a lady's face. Look closely . . . the nose and eye of the face is a dog!

Illusion by Jason
This clever illusion has two squirrels tessellating around an acorn. Notice how perfectly just two colors work together to complete Jason's image.

Illusion by Starlette
Look carefully again . . . do you see the word tree in the beautifully drawn limbs of the tree? Very clever, Starlette!

Friday, January 27, 2017

FIFTH GRADE . . . Drawing like Vincent


Sketch by Mason

This week our sketchpad assignment was to draw like Vincent van Gogh. Some students created a drawing or painting based on one of his well known compositions, and others focused on a more original subject matter, filling it with the short directional strokes typical of a van Gogh. Here are some of our interpretations . . .

Sketch by Matthew

Sketch by Riya

Sketch by Matteo

Painting by Alexandra

Painting by Gabriella S.

Sketch by James

Painting by Syena





Tuesday, January 24, 2017

FIRST GRADE . . . Weaving a pattern!

Weaving by Michaela

First Graders learned how to weave with yarn on a handmade loom. This is a project that celebrates the art and culture of the Native Americans and teaches us a wonderful technique using patterns.

Our handmade looms were created out of the cardboard base from water bottle trays and we recycle these looms every year. Six slits are cut into both ends of the cardboard and yarn is strung from top to bottom creating the warp (or vertical) strings of the loom.

Next, students choose a color of yarn to weave with. We learned how to measure the yarn against a table edge by working in pairs with our friends. One student holds the end of the yarn against the end of the table and the other student unrolls the yarn to match the length of the table and cuts it off.







To weave with our colored yarns, we learned how to follow a pattern of "Over, Under, Over, Under, Over, Under." Not only is the process of weaving a pattern, but we can also create a pattern by alternating colors of yarn.

The completed weavings were then removed from the cardboard looms and they now hang from twigs that the students found outside and brought into school.

A special thank you to guest weavers, Dr. Danial and Mrs. Reddington, for helping out with one of our weaving lessons!


Here are some examples of our completed woven designs. To see all of our work, follow this link to our home page of Artsonia!  http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=114839

Weaving by As'ad
Weaving by Claire
Weaving by Phillip

Weaving by Camila

Weaving by Sadie
Note to families...
This art blog will be updated regularly with new posts sharing our daily activities in the art room and news about upcoming art exhibits. To respect the privacy of our students, names will always be limited to first name only and identifiable photos will never be accompanied with a name. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to write in the comment box below or send me an email at blevine@ranneyschool.org. I would love to hear from you!
    In my class, students are given the chance to explore different materials and fun new techniques as they develop their signature style. Some young artists love to draw with a pencil, some like to paint on canvas or create images in a digital format, while others prefer working with clay and molding three-dimensional forms. In my classroom, we use a variety of materials allowing all artists to experiment and figure out which type of art they like the best. At Ranney School, we place a strong emphasis on originality and celebrate artistic differences, always nurturing and encouraging the imagination of every student.
     Remember to check out our display of finished artwork and student portfolios in the Ranney home page of Artsonia.com.  http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=114839

Friday, January 20, 2017

GRAPHIC ARTS . . . Our Logo Designs

Logo by Dakota

Logo by Carter

Graphic artists experimented with the design tools in Adobe Illustrator. Learning how to draw shapes and add color is just the first step in graphic design. To make our logos, we also added our initials to the block of color. The letters could be any typeface and they should read well as a white shape in the color square. To make it a more dynamic design, the letters must touch each other and at least one part of one of the letters has to touch a side of the square. Here are more of our logo designs . . .


Logo by Ava G

Logo by Ava J.
Logo by Gabriel G.
Logo by Petra

Logo by Rianna


Logo by Gabrielle

Logo by John C.

Logo by Logan

Logo by Maggie

Logo by Nico

Logo by Sean

Thursday, January 19, 2017

FOURTH GRADE . . . Animals in their natural habitat

Drawing by Ava G.
Why would an artist want to draw upside down? I don't suggest that an artist should stand on his or her head . . . but to draw an image that is turned around. It is a challenge for art students to learn how to observe the world as an artist does and see all the fine details of an image correctly. Drawing this way can trick your eyes into observing more of the fine details of the picture.

For example, when you look at a picture of a horse the regular way, your mind invariably takes over as you are drawing and you tend to draw what you remember how a horse looks, not focusing on the details in the picture in front of you. The image of the horse in your mind probably has an four thin legs as all horses do. But are you really seeing those legs as they appear in the picture, with all the angles and the lines?

Now look at this upside down picture of a horse. By turning the image around, we do not automatically see a horse, but a random design of angles and curved lines. It is much easier to notice how to draw the legs this way. Even the negative space in between the legs is easier to see and that can help us identify the shape of each leg.


Our drawings in class were created by looking at upside down photographs of wild animals in their natural habitat. This was a hard project for all of us but I am very proud of how accurate they turned out. Even the design in the colorful feathers and fur was a challenge to observe! Once we completed our drawings with pencil, we used blends of colored pencils to complete the scenes. To see all of our wildlife studies, click on this link to the Ranney home page on Artsonia.   http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=114839

Drawing by Marley L.

Drawing by Alex G.

Drawing by Rianna K.

Drawing by Desmond P.

Drawing by Sophia B.

Drawing by Adam T.

Drawing by Ruby B.



Note to families...
This art blog will be updated regularly with new posts sharing our daily activities in the art room and news about upcoming art exhibits. To respect the privacy of our students, names will always be limited to first name only and identifiable photos will never be accompanied with a name. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to write in the comment box below or send me an email at blevine@ranneyschool.org. I would love to hear from you!
    In my class, students are given the chance to explore different materials and fun new techniques as they develop their signature style. Some young artists love to draw with a pencil, some like to paint on canvas or create images in a digital format, while others prefer working with clay and molding three-dimensional forms. In my classroom, we use a variety of materials allowing all artists to experiment and figure out which type of art they like the best. At Ranney School, we place a strong emphasis on originality and celebrate artistic differences, always nurturing and encouraging the imagination of every student.
     Remember to check out our display of finished artwork and student portfolios in the Ranney home page of Artsonia.com.  http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=114839